A Directory of Sheepadoodle Breeders


So you want a Sheepadoodle. Or a Mini Sheepadoodle.

Great!

Where the heck do you get Sheepadoodle or Mini Sheepadoodle puppies from?

Sheepadoodles are growing ever more popular. That means, on the one hand, the number of Sheepadoodle breeders is increasing too. But on the other hand, at the moment, there are more people wanting Sheepadoodle and Mini Sheepadoodle puppies than there are breeders breeding them.

Cut to the chase. We’ve compiled a directory of Sheepadoodle and Mini Sheepadoodle breeders in the USA and Canada, state by state.

Now, we can’t stress this too highly. We have not been paid to include breeders on this list. Nor have we used the dealers who feature on it. As such, this list does not constitute a recommendation. It is at best a Level #1 contact list, from which you can launch your own research.

 Finding the Right Sheepadoodle Breeder

Finding the right Sheepadoodle breeder is harder than it sounds, because where there’s a market for desirable dogs, you’ll get backyard breeders and puppy farms standing right alongside responsible breeders, smiling and looking entirely believable.

So you need to research the breeder before you take a puppy from them.

Contact the breeder by email, phone, or both. Check out their website if they have one. Check out any socials. Check out Facebook Sheepadoodle groups. And ask your chosen dealer questions. Ask them allll the questions. If you can, visit them in person. If you can’t, ask your questions by phone, so you can get some straight answers – and so can the breeder.

Any decent breeder will want to ask you questions too, to ensure the future happiness and health of their puppies. If the only question they’re interested in is how you can pay – nope your way out of that conversation in a big hurry.

Don’t get bent out of shape if the breeder asks you lots of questions in their turn – be worried if they don’t.

Meanwhile, any breeder worth the name should be able to answer your questions about exercise, feeding, grooming, any health issues, temperament, and more.

If they don’t know all of this to a degree that they can answer your questions – you should probably be the breeder, rather than them.

Check out the terms and conditions your chosen breeder lists on their website. One standard clause among caring breeders is that if something happens that renders you incapable of looking after the dog, it’s returned to them.

If they don’t care about its future, chances are they haven’t cared about its past either. Don’t do business with such breeders.

Want an easy trick question? Ask them how soon you can pick up the puppy, and how old it will be when you can.

Anything earlier than 8 weeks? Danger, Will Robinson! Puppies lose out on a ton of socializing techniques if you take them away from their mothers before the 8-week period is up.

The Puppy Waitlist

Be patient in your search for a Sheepadoodle or Mini Sheepadoodle puppy. Lots of breeders have waitlists up to a year long. Don’t be put off by that – good things come to those who wait, and a Sheepadoodle or Mini Sheepadoodle is the definition of good things. Get on the waitlist now – the sooner you join, the sooner you reach the front of the line. Get on as many waitlists as you can – just remember to tell the breeders to take you off their waitlist when you get the puppy you want.

Sheepadoodle Nope Flags

We’ve mentioned several things that should act as nope flags – signs that you should not do business with particular breeders. But here’s a quick run-down of the big nopes.

If your potential breeder:

  • Is willing to give you the puppy before the 8-week point
  • Refuses to show you health testing certificates
  • Won’t show you the puppy’s vet records
  • Doesn’t raise the puppy with the parent dogs on site
  • Refuses you information on the parent dogs, or
  • Doesn’t offer a guarantee on the puppy

Walk away.

Sheepadoodle Breeders in North America

Remember what we said – This list is a first port of call, not a substitute for research.

Sheepadoodle Breeders in the United States

 Sheepadoodle Breeders in Canada

 Frequently Asked Sheepadoodle Questions

  1.   What is the average size of a sheepadoodle?

When they’re fully grown, a Sheepadoodle will weigh between around 45-80 pounds, and stand something between 13-28 inches tall. There are of course variations and exceptions depending on the size of the parents, but these are the average figures.

  1.   How much should I expect to pay for a Sheepadoodle?

Standard Sheepadoodles retail for anything between $2-4000, and breeders can afford to charge those prices because many have a waitlist up to a year long.

In terms of ‘running costs,’ apart from food, training, and any vet bills, remember to factor in up to $100 every 4-6 weeks on grooming. Yes, they need it. No, it’s not negotiable.

  1.   How much work is a Sheepadoodle?

Oh boy. ‘Lots’ is the simple answer. Yes, they’re adorable – that’s how they get away with so much. But yes, they’re lots of work.

It’s not just about the need for frequent grooming. Like most doodles, they’re bright dogs – which is great in theory, but also means they need mental engagement and stimulation, on top of the standard daily dog walks and activities.

We’re talking up to 2 hours of stimulating activity per day, with a good home brushing every second day (or daily if you have a longer-haired Sheepadoodle). No, that doesn’t get you out of the regular professional grooming. So yes – quite a lot of work.

  1. What’s a Sheepadoodle’s temperament like?

While it’s a mistake to generalize too much on a breed, overall, a Sheepadoodle’s temperament is what justifies all the grooming and mental stimulation. They’re usually playful, loyal, bright, friendly, and break-your-heart cute and friendly.

  1. Sheepadoodles as guard dogs – yes or no?

Pretty good instinctively, and better with training. They’re bright and protective, so will sense strangers, and can be trained to bark when they do so. So overall, pretty good if you want to train them as guard dogs.

  1. Is there much cuddling with Sheepadoodles?

Imagine a breed of dog that was half sheepdog, half poodle, all teddy bear. That’s your Sheepadoodle. Again, your mileage may vary from dog to dog, but as a breed, yes, they’re here for all the cuddles you want to give them.

  1. I have allergies. How hypoallergenic is a Sheepadoodle?

Mmmm technically no dog’s 100% hypoallergenic unless you have them vacuum-sealed. But an F1 generation Sheepadoodle (bred from an Old English Sheepdog and a Poodle) is about as hypoallergenic as it gets in Doodle World.

  1. But do Sheepadoodles shed?

Nope. Non-shedding dog, right here. So on the one hand, yay for lack of dander. On the other hand, the lack of shedding is what makes the regular grooming so necessary – they’re not being precious, but if you leave it too long, their hair can form painful mats.

  1. How smart are Sheepadoodles?

The Poodle is among the smartest dogs on the planet. The Old English Sheepdog is cute as all get-out, but it didn’t survive into the 21st-century on its looks alone – it’s a working breed, capable of understanding commands and carrying them out. When those two crazy pups got together, something funny, devious, and downright Harvard was the result.

  1. I need a dog that’s good around kids. Will a Sheepadoodle fit the bill?

Here’s a thing. Where you might get bored by your kid showing you the same trick for the ten-thousandth time, so long as it’s in a context of play, your Sheepadoodle will love it.

Putting your Sheepadoodle and your kid together for hours at a time is the cutest thing on the planet – and they both know it! Obviously, don’t leave them unsupervised – quite apart from anything else, they’ll probably figure out a way of ruling the world.

  1. Are Sheepadoodles playful?

Sheepadoodles will play all day if you have the time. Play all you like, you won’t wear out a Sheepadoodle’s enthusiasm for the next game. Or the next one. Or the next…

  1. What is grooming a Sheepadoodle like?

It’s like a day job, that’s what it’s like. Takes hours, has to be done, the client’s uncooperative and all your good work will be undone within a day or two.

Patience, practice, and an implacable will are what you need to groom a Sheepadoodle. Also, a couple of extra elbows wouldn’t go amiss.

  1. What is the energy level of a Sheepadoodle?

They’re a mid-to-high energy breed. When they’re high energy, it’s like having Tigger to tea. When they’re mid-energy, it’s like having an inquisitive 4-year-old with boundaries that have to be established.

  1. What should I be looking out for healthwise in a Sheepadoodle?

Healthwise, it’s something of a complex pairing, the Old English Sheepdog and the Poodle.

The Sheepadoodle can be prone to any of the complaints of either of its parents, which means bloat, seizures, joint issues, and sensitive digestion can be among its destinies. This is one reason it’s important to get information from the breeder on the health of the parent dogs.

  1. How long do Sheepadoodles live?

We’ll let you know when they’ve died of old age in sufficient numbers to form a trend.

Seriously, as a new breed, the numbers really aren’t in yet, though Old Age Sheepdogs average around 11 years, and Poodles around 12, so anything over a decade and without being unduly morbid, you might want to get on the waitlist for your next Sheepadoodle.

Conclusion

Finding Sheepadoodle puppies for sale is one thing. Finding them for sale from the best breeders is a whole other ball game.

Do your research, ask your questions, and satisfy yourself that the breeder breeds dogs for the love of the dogs as well as for financial profit. That’s not starry-eyed sentimentalism, it’s hardcore pet welfare common sense.

Kerry White

Kerry White is an avid dog lover and writer, knowing all there is to know about our furry friends. Kerry has been writing for PetDT for three years now, wanting to use her knowledge for good and share everything she can with new dog owners. Kerry has two dogs herself - a German shepherd called Banjo and a chocolate labrador called Buttons. Kerry knows more than anyone how adjusting to new life with a puppy can turn your life upside down, and she wants to ease some of the burdens through her articles.

Recent Posts